Professors win 2016 Emerging Voices Award from Architectural League of New York

Mood Ring House, in south Fayetteville, which uses LED lighting to exhibit different personalities from daytime to nighttime. (Photo by Tim Hursley)

Mood Ring House, in south Fayetteville, which uses LED lighting to exhibit different personalities from daytime to nighttime. (Photo by Tim Hursley)

By Lauren Randall

As winners of the 2016 Emerging Voices Award, Frank Jacobus and Marc Manack spoke in the Architectural League of New York’s lecture series in April. The portfolio they had submitted for the award highlighted work they’d collaborated on over the past few years.

“It’s just really a great honor for us,” Manack said in the spring. “We began our collaboration just three and a half years ago, so to get this recognition is huge for our practice.”

The Architectural League’s Emerging Voices program recognizes firms based in the United States, Canada and Mexico with “distinct design voices” that influence their disciplines and the built environment. “They seek architects who are leaders in their field – not only by the projects they build, but how they philosophically position and represent their work,” Manack said. Continue reading

A collaboration in a Fayetteville walnut grove for Earth Day 2016

The installation was inspired by and is located on a walnut grove that once belonged to Noah Drake, a former University of Arkansas professor. (Photo by Michelle Parks)

The installation was inspired by and is located on a walnut grove that once belonged to Noah Drake, a former University of Arkansas professor. (Photo by Michelle Parks)

By Lauren Randall

Faculty and students collaborated to create a landscape installation inspired by a walnut grove that once belonged to Noah Drake. The project was conceptualized and designed as a collaboration between three professors and evolved into an outdoor learning opportunity for students.

Students from landscape architecture and local high schools met early the Saturday after Earth Day 2016 at the walnut grove in Fayetteville to construct a design created by Edmund Harriss, a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences, together with Carl Smith, an associate professor of landscape architecture, and Angela Carpenter, a visiting assistant professor, both in the Fay Jones School. This was a chance for students to become more exposed to the possibilities of landscape architecture, particularly in collaboration with other disciplines. The installation followed several months of design and conceptualization between the three faculty members. Continue reading